An Open Letter to the Athlete We Must Stop Recruiting

An Open Letter - Fearless Coaching

Many high school athletes aspire to earn a spot on the roster of a college team. Often, the athlete, or their parents, make significant mistakes in this process. Often, the athlete doesn’t understand the right – and wrong – priorities.

Becky Carlson is the Head Coach of the NCAA D-I Rugby team at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Connecticut. Earlier this week, she posted an excellent article about recruiting prospective student athletes for college athletics. It exactly matches comments and stories I hear from a wide variety of other college coaches and that I have observed firsthand. Linked here is her article; read it very carefully! Then come back to this post.

An Open Letter to the Athlete We Must Stop Recruiting

Shocked? Good! She speaks the truth! Get busy!

Or as you read did you think that all these things should be obvious? You just became a top prospect! Call us! Right now! 😉

Below are some additional thoughts and opinions from someone who coaches middle school, high school, college, and adult athletes and teams.

High School Athletes

We want to know about your character. We want to know how you handle adversity. We want to know how you relate with and to others. We want to know how you interact with your teammates and coaches. We want to know what you value and your priorities. We want to know what kind of effort you put forth of your own volition – in sports and in the classroom. We want to know how much or how little you take responsibility for your failures and how you handle your successes.

We want to know about your grades. We want to know about your academic goals. We want to know about your post-college goals and plans.

We want to know what sports means to you. We want to now your goals and dreams and aspirations. We want to know what you are passionate about, in sports and in life. We want to know about your other sports and activities, past and present.

Finally, we want to know about your capabilities in the sport. Yes, that is last. Oh, and if you can’t or won’t tell us your grades or scores early in the recruiting process, we know you don’t own them and that is a red flag. Tell us your grades and scores, how you feel about your them, and what you are doing to improve. Be specific so we know exactly what the grade or GPA score is for, and don’t give us your best practice score – competition is what counts.

Contact the coach during the summer before your junior year of high school. We even get emails from freshmen and sophomores, and email our replies once the NCAA contact-permitted date arrives. Be sure to give your first and last name, year in school and when you expect to graduate, where you live and the name of your school, your club if any, your GPA and any other academic information, and tell about yourself. If you don’t hear back right away, follow up. Be polite yet persistent! (Remember, if they don’t know your year in school, you will get NO response.)

Recruiting rules and dates vary for NCAA Division I, II, and III, so if you don’t hear back right away, keep sending periodic updates with grades, scores, and major competitions where you will be participating. Also, the college coach can email or talk with your coach at any time if you provide their name and contact information.

If you initiate contact, and if you respond to emails and phone calls on a timely basis, that sets you apart. Athletes who can’t be bothered to respond certainly are not showing good character or initiative.

High School Parents

If you make the first contact and/or make most or all of the contacts, you do your child a severe disservice. If you have to make contact on behalf of your child, there is a good chance you are wasting your time. We already know what we need to know. I’m not being harsh. Just stating reality.

Of course, once your child has established contact and we have a dialog underway, we would love to hear from you as well. This is a big decision and you should be informed about the school, coach, and team that will become a huge part of your child’s life. Just don’t dominate the conversation, especially on a visit.

When your child can’t get a word in edgewise, we can’t get to know them. Then we might pass on your child when they otherwise would have been great for us, and us for them, but we could not tell and wouldn’t take the chance.

Also, model appropriate character, especially at games. Be a good fan. Be a good sport parent. Don’t know what that means? Google is your friend! And read this posting:

The Only Six Words Parents Need to Say to Their Kids About Sports — Or Any Performance

If you are not a good sport parent, your child doesn’t want you at the game. Neither do their coaches and neither do your child’s teammates. Please don’t be that parent!

High School & Junior Coaches

College coaches really don’t care about our recommendations unless they have gotten to know us well and trust our opinion. It’s nothing personal, it’s just how things work. Too many coaches give glowing recommendations for average athletes. Let your athletes shine for themselves.

This past year, I suggested to the head coach of one of the top NCAA rifle teams that she might want to take a look at a certain athlete that I have the pleasure of working with. I didn’t give her a glowing recommendation of the athlete, I just stated that she might want to take a close look. The coach understood me and appreciated that I didn’t do a sell job. Later, I facilitated a meeting at their mutual request to take place after a major competition ended and they took it from there. A year later, the young lady joined that coach’s team… she didn’t need my recommendation, had shined on her own, and earned a spot on the roster!

Encourage your athletes to get their grades, work on their sport, focus on themselves, and on the things they need in life to succeed. Grades, scores, and recruiting will turn out just fine.

College Athletes

Think you’ve got it made? Nope!

Maybe you got lucky in regard to some of the things she wrote about. Don’t take the chance that your time will run out. Your spot is not assured for all 4 years. Did you spot anything in the article that you can improve upon? Yes? Good, get busy! No? OK, hopefully that means you are not delusional and instead are one of those “perfect” athletes. If so, help your teammates become better teammates. Lead by example.

College Parents

This is college. Your child is an adult. (I know that is a shock, and sometimes they still seem to act like a child.) We deal with athletes as young adults. It is part of their development in the college years. Get out of your child’s way and let them be a college athlete. Luckily, most parents understand this.

Sadly, a few don’t. The worst examples: One couple lied to their child about which colleges accepted the student in order to force their child to go to a certain school. The student found out. That didn’t turn out well.

Another athlete was told that if they didn’t make the starting roster they would not be allowed to return to school the next semester. Yup!

You can’t make this stuff up!

Again, luckily, most parents let their child fly from the nest. You know who you are. Your child and the coaches thank you!

We love having you at the games. Remember this is college. Let your child be a young adult. Be a good fan. Be a good sport parent. Don’t know what that means? Google is your friend! And read this posting:

The Only Six Words Parents Need to Say to Their Kids About Sports — Or Any Performance

If you are not a good sport parent, your child doesn’t want you at the game. Neither do we and neither do your child’s teammates.

These parents are the very reason their child’s scores – and grades – are dropping. Sadly, we have seen it happen, far too many times. Please don’t be that parent!

I hope this has been an eye-opening and helpful post. Please share your thoughts, comments, and suggestions for improvement, either below or privately, as you prefer.

College sports can be a wonderfully life-changing experience. Enjoy!

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2016 – Results – Georgia – State Junior Olympics – Rifle & Pistol

USAS JO Logo

Georgia statewide results are now (Fri 05 Feb 2016) available for download.

UPDATE Fri 05 Feb 2016 10:30 PM EST – Results have been corrected and reposted.

2016 USA Shooting Junior Olympics Georgia State Championship Final Results

Congratulations to all the participants. It looks like there will be a large group of Georgia athletes invited to the national Junior Olympics! Individual award medals provided by USA Shooting will be distributed soon.

State Champion, Automatic, and First Round national invitations will be emailed and posted on Mon 08 Feb 2016. Be sure to RSVP right away to reserve your place. Second Round invitations usually follow a week or two later.

 

Thank You!

Thank you to all the athletes, coaches, parents, and match staff for participating in the state Junior Olympics program this year.  Have a great year!

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2016 – Georgia – State Junior Olympics – CMP Three Position Air Rifle JO State Championship

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The sites and dates for the 2016 CMP Three Position Air Rifle Junior Olympics Georgia State Championship have been announced.

Once again, we will have three sites for the state qualifiers.

South – Sat 23 Apr 2016 – Waycross, GA
Match Director: Maurice England
Match Program: Download TBD

Central – Fri-Sun 01-03 Apr 2016 – Griffin, GA
Match Director: Lisa Kelley
Match Program: Download TBD

North – Sat 02 Apr 2016 – Dahlonega, GA
Match Director: JP O’Connor
Match Program: Download from here

The Central location will use paper targets scored with Orion, while the South and North locations will use electronic targets.

Host sites, match director names and contact information may be found in the CMP competition search web page or directly at this link. Note this one link is for all locations. See the contact information for each location at the top of the listing. (Central location information not available yet on that site.)

Contact the appropriate Match Director to obtain a match program and other information for the South location, and at the download links above for the Central and North locations. Registration is via mail to each location.

Send in your entry early. Prime relays fill up early, especially at the North location.

These events are qualifiers for the national events and are EIC points eligible. Hosted and run by the CMP, the National Junior Olympic 3P Air Rifle Championship is a very popular program involving thousands of three position air rifle athletes (sporter and precision) from all over the country.

Qualifying for either of the CMP national events allows the team or individual to compete in BOTH CMP championships: the JO event mentioned above and the CMP National  3P Air Rifle Championship. Both events usually include generous cash prizes.

Because many athletes are only involved in 3P air rifle, they are unaware of the Olympic events and the USA Shooting Junior Olympics discussed here. They should participate in both programs if shooting precision air rifle.

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2016 Georgia – State Junior Olympics – Rifle & Pistol

USAS JO Logo

The sites and dates for the 2015-2016 USA Shooting Georgia State Rifle & Pistol Junior Olympics Championship have been announced.

For the third year in a row, we will have three sites for the state qualifier competitions. I will again serve as the state coordinator, collecting state-wide results and sending out the award medals provided by USA Shooting.

South – Sat 23 Jan 2016 – Waycross, GA
Air Rifle, Air Pistol

Central – Fri-Sun 8-10 Jan 2016 – Griffin, GA
Air Rifle, Air Pistol, Smallbore Rifle (3×20)

North – Sat-Sun 16-17 Jan 2016 – Dahlonega, GA
Air Rifle, Air Pistol, Smallbore Rifle (3×20), Sport Pistol

The Central location will use paper targets scored with Orion, while the South and North locations will use electronic targets.

Contact the appropriate Match Director to obtain a match program and other information. Host sites, match director names and contact information may be found in the “2015-2016 Rifle/Pistol State Junior Olympic Host Sites!!!” spreadsheet link on the USA Shooting National Junior Olympic Program page, along with additional general information.

Send in your entry early. Prime relays fill up early, especially at the North location.

You may download the North location Match Program & Entry Form for information and entry instructions. This program also has a complete explanation of all THREE ways to earn an invitation to the National Junior Olympic Shooting Championships in the spring along with updated at-large selection scores from last year. Currently planned for April, the national dates and schedules have not been published at this time.

Be sure to enter, even if you think that you are not “ready” for this competition. Many people were surprised last year when they earned an invitation! Others who are good enough missed out because they did not enter.

Renew your USA Shooting membership online, or join online right away so you have your membership number, as required on the JO entry forms.

If you cannot compete in one of the events in Georgia, you may compete as a non-resident in any other state’s event to potentially earn an automatic or at-large invitation. Find a host site that is convenient for you and make contact.

For additional information on the USA Shooting Junior Olympics, including national qualification procedures and scores, check the following blog post:
Earning Junior Olympics Invitations Note that the posting is from 2014; scores are now out of date and other information is subject to change. Download the North location program at the link above for latest scores.

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Your comments and responses are always welcome.

Be sure to check this blog’s menu to find more information about the blog, its author, and additional resources.

To be notified of new posts, go to the “Home” page and select the small blue “Follow…” link on the right side of the page just above the search box. On mobile devices, scroll way down near the bottom to find the “Follow…” link.

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Meeting Myself for the First Time

Hannah Peevy Post Float

As a coach, I am privileged, honored, and lucky to work with a number of remarkable young people. Ranging in age from 12 to 22 mostly, with some older or much older, I get to watch as they grow, learn, and mature as people and as athletes. Truly a blessing.

Many people face challenges at a young age and I have watched (and sometimes been in a position to help and/or encourage) as they have worked to overcome those challenges. One of the remarkable young athletes that I work with, Hannah Peevy, recently wrote about her experiences as she began floating in a sensory deprivation tank. (See link below or here for more information.) Faced with health challenges, her journey has not been easy and we wondered if floating might help. Another of my athletes, Leigh Yarbrough, had shared her thoughts about floating experiences with Hannah as well, so off she went to find out.

Here is Hannah’s entire essay about her first few floating experiences.

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Meeting Myself for the First Time

At age 20, I introduce myself as Hannah Peevy, a college student on my way to earning a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. I am actively involved in hobbies such as Olympic style precision shooting with air rifle and precision small-bore rifle. Among these hobbies, my other interests include managing a dairy farm alongside my mother and sister. For the most part a healthy, active, young adult.

While I do have many blessing in this life, I have had the unfortunate journey of living with chronic pain and undiagnosed medical issues. In my fifth year of school, I began my journey to understand why I had aches and pains. Through countless doctor visits throughout middle and high school, a couple of hospital visits, and trying countless alternatives, I am still left with the same bleakness of being undiagnosed. While it’s frustrating and hard not to get discouraged, I turned in a different direction. With faith, I knew God carries me through, guiding me in my most difficult times. I remind myself daily; He would not put on one’s shoulder what he/she could not handle. I made the decision not to take daily medications, to stop being treated, and just to carry on throughout college trying to be in control of things like my stress level, my diet, and more natural solutions.

Upon hearing my story, a good friend of mine, JP O’Connor, urged me to try floating. At first, I regretfully admit, I thought I was getting another quick-fix remedy from someone with good intentions, but didn’t understand my situation. How can floating in salt water really help years upon years of pain that doctors couldn’t even help solve? My ignorance didn’t outweigh my curiosity and hopefulness of something that could be an answer. Upon reading and watching some of the personal testimonies of floaters, I had to at least give it a chance.

On January 14th, 2015 I experience my first float at FLO2S in Atlanta. After a stressful day of microbiology lecture/lab and rushing against traffic to make it on time, I was hoping this was the relief I was seeking. Eager and excited, I got to meet Edward at FLO2S for the first time. He is such an awesome person. I couldn’t have asked for a kinder person to talk to about some of my day to day struggles with chronic back pain, arthritis, and stress. He shared in my excitement and hopefulness that floating would help me like the others who have sworn by it.

Entering the shower room for my pre-floating experience I had a mixture of emotions and thoughts. Little did I know upon stepping into the floating cave for the first time that I would meet the true Hannah. I entered, laying into the water, feeling awkward at first, but slowly allowing my body to relax. I allowed my body to slowly rise in the water. It was such a profound feeling of having no sound, no light, no temperature differences, and no downward pull on my body. I laughed at the thought “I could get used to this.” Thinking to myself, “Where can I put this in my future house and I wonder if Pinterest has a DIY project board to guide me?” Such silly thoughts from your typical college girl, “When in doubt, Pinterest it out! Right?”

Ten, fifteen, maybe twenty minutes into my float session I realized I had no indication of the time I had spent mulling over random thoughts of school assignments, this feels strange, what I need to get done, I wonder this… I wonder that…. It occurred to me, “Does my mind really control me like this?” A victim of society’s hustle and bustle, I realized I had become that person. Being someone with a Type A personality was never a surprise to me, but had I really allowed myself to become victim to my own self worry, criticism, and self-inflicted stress? Taking a deep breath, I focused in on the sound of my heart beat. It was beating at a fluttering rate. How did I miss that? Even as a precision shooter, how could I have not been capable of picking up on it? It was habit; it had come to be a part of my life. Stress had become my norm. Taking another deep breath; just listening. I felt my heart rate slow, becoming more rhythmatic with each deep breath I took in and slowly allowed the air to escape my lungs once more. It really is beautiful, the feeling of your heartbeat beneath the surface. Hearing it methodically sustain me in that moment, each beat following the next in a rhythmatic promise. It struck me as almost poetic.

Allowing myself to really relax, entering into a daze-like restful state, with small moments of rushing thoughts. I knew my body was not used to this, and it would be my job to allow my inner self to let go of day to day materials, thoughts, and confront the reality of a deeper mind. I sleepily heard my signal that my float session was over, music beginning to play. Really, an hour and a half had already passed? I felt unstable to walk, gliding awkwardly to greet my mom who was waiting for me in the lobby. Edward and my mother, reading my reaction, could tell I had experienced something different. I loved it. That night for the first time in the longest I rested soundly, without disturbances, a full night’s sleep. I woke to a refreshed feeling and having acute focus within my classes. While feeling refreshed and sleeping so soundly, I was surprised to find that my body, back and muscles were sore. Different from pain, but sore, almost bruised feeling. The best way to explain it would be the feeling you get after a new workout or a deep tissue massage. Floating had made my body’s muscles release some of the built up tension that I had been suffering from. Without realizing it, my neck, back and shoulders were at a constant state of tension. The floating session, in a way stretched it out, releasing some of that tension, making my body sore. Like a good work out sore. I was amazed. There was more to this, and with many more floating sessions I would begin to understand. The morning after my first float I snapped this picture (above) for Instagram.

I learned more and more about myself each and every time I went into the floating chamber. My second floating experience, I came away frightened, I believe and truly felt that I had attended my own funeral. Sounds crazy? I know, visions and thoughts, they came to me differently each float session. Some rewarding and some frightening, but it was all parts of my deeper mind surfacing and telling me something more about myself. One of my most interesting experiences occurred to me during my third float session. Describing to Edward, when I felt content and happy, my water felt warm. But as soon as I felt anxious or worried about something, my water turned an uncomfortable cold. My perceptions were connected to my state of mind. I took away from this that in situations when I allow stress to manifest within me, I only feel worse. Furthermore, routinely in each float session thereafter, I thought of one thing at a time, or a certain person, what memory I associated with them, and how my body reacted to that thought. Measuring my heart rate change, my perceive temperature of the water allowed me to identify what were the biggest stressors in my life. That is valuable.

Each time, I walked away with a restful night’s sleep and a better understanding of how to manage day to day life. This is all good, but how does that help chronic pain? While I didn’t find a cure or a quick answer to my pain I deal with, I did find management. While I may not be able to choose what I live with, I have a choice in how I live with it. Part of undiagnosed autoimmune diseases, such as mine, is the management of stress. When your body is under huge amounts of stress or you’re not getting the deep sleep throughout the night, it takes a huge toll on your body. By simply managing these aspects of my life, pain was reduced and more manageable. I had greater focus with my shooting and in class. Something as simple as note taking can become cloudy when your mind and body are not in the right state. I highly recommend floating; you have nothing to lose, but so much to gain.

As a college student and active shooting athlete, it’s hard to make the necessary time aside from the demands of my schedule, but it is highly worth it. Who knew at age twenty I would be meeting myself for the first time, truly me. My raw thoughts, feelings, emotions. Don’t allow yourself to be what society makes you, you are more than that.

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Links:

Hannah’s interview after her first float

More information at FLO2S

Essay and photograph copyright 2015 Hannah Peevy

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Feel free to “share” this and any posting on this blog.

Your comments and responses are always welcome.

Be sure to check this blog’s menu to find more information about the blog, its author, and additional resources.

To be notified of new posts, go to the “Home” page and select the small blue “Follow…” link on the right side of the page just above the search box. On mobile devices, scroll way down near the bottom to find the “Follow…” link.

Feel Center!

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Excellence – Perseverance – Sportsmanship

2015 NRA Intercollegiate Club Rifle Championship - Nathan Switzer, Leigh Yarbrough, JP O'Connor, Rachel Mangan, Madeleine Godwin

2015 NRA Intercollegiate Club Rifle Championship – Nathan Switzer, Leigh Yarbrough, JP O’Connor, Rachel Mangan, Madeleine Godwin

The 6th annual NRA Intercollegiate Club Rifle National Championship was recently held at the US Army Marksmanship Unit at Fort Benning, GA. As with all competitions, there were many stories of success and… many learning opportunities. There were also many stories of great sportsmanship. It was a wonderful competition!

The athletes pictured here each have their own stories of challenges and obstacles overcome, and excellence achieved, just like every athlete in every sport.

Madeleine quietly went about her business and swept everything. She was 1st in both the 60 shot standing air rifle and 3 position smallbore events, easily winning the Overall Aggregate Championship, and held the top spot on both All-Star teams. She and I worked together in a clinic I did at her club in fall 2013, kept in touch a bit since then, and have recently started working together again. She has faced a number of challenges in shooting and life and has worked hard to excel… all while remaining positive, quiet, and humble. Her primary coach is Nathan who is and has been a student of mine for many years, so Madeleine had to “put up” with my ideas from him as well, while also benefiting from his deep experience and insight.

Rachel was 2nd overall, 4th air, 3rd smallbore, and was named to both first teams of the All-Star team. She has worked very hard this year to improve her shooting and toughen her competitiveness. Just two weeks earlier, she took a huge step forward in the southeastern collegiate rifle conference final when she battled 7 others to be one of the last three finalists standing. She kept battling and took gold against the top athlete from NC State (silver) and from the University of North Georgia (bronze). It was really fun to watch her work that final! Rachel is a completely different competitor compared to who she was at the beginning of the season. It has been wonderful to watch her transform herself!

Leigh, the last year’s overall aggregate champion, was 4th overall, 3rd air, 6th smallbore, and was named to both All-Star teams. All this after 6 months off to heal a left wrist injury and recuperate from an illness. Her only two smallbore matches after the time off were sectionals and this event.

Her wrist still isn’t fully healed yet, and by the second prone series of the smallbore 3×20 prone stage, I could hear hear moan in pain after each shot. But she never gave up and completed the match… and she never said a word before, during, or afterward about how it affected her. On match day, we just shoot.

During both events in this championship, we noticed that she didn’t quite have her usual “edge” but there was no obvious reason. Sometimes that is how things go. No, it wasn’t because of the 6 months off. She was very sharp the previous weekend when she and Rachel spent a couple of days on the range with me doing competition intensity drills. Later we discovered why: the day after the match she became very sick and had a 102 degree fever for a couple of days. When your body is fighting an oncoming illness, it cannot respond as usual, even days ahead of time. The timing was unfortunate, but we bring our best to each competition and we grow for the next one.

The girls almost swept the podium for the overall aggregate. However, Cory Miller of New Mexico kept the pressure on and took 3rd overall ahead of Leigh. On the second day, he was set up right next to Madeleine, so it was fun watching them side by side go head to head as they fought each other for the top two air rifle medals!

Priorities

Speaking of the fun watching those two battle, and fun watching all the athletes that weekend, There is something that I really love as a coach that isn’t often talked about. I love watching my athletes and other athletes shoot. I love watching them compete. I love watching them train, even when it isn’t going well. They are learning and having fun – or learning about overcoming rough spots, which in the end is fun. Sometimes, but not often enough, I even say to them “I love watching you shoot.” You should see their reaction – it is awesome!

Many coaches and parents worry about the score or if Suzie or Johnnie is going to do well and then get all over them on the ride home. Of course I want my athletes to do well. But that will come in the due course of time. If they do well, as they did in this competition, I am happy for them. If they fall short of their goals, it is perfectly fine; we learn from our mistakes and we go back to work. More on this topic here.

I just love watching them shoot. These athletes certainly gave me something fun to watch that weekend! And they all came off the line with smiles knowing they had given it their best. That is the best reward of all, for them and for me, for all the long hours on the range.

Sportsmanship

Due to some computer issues, the script for the awards ceremony had 2 team errors and an individual overall aggregate error. Luckily, the errors were caught during the ceremony and corrected. The incorrect awardees asked if they could come up and present the awards to the correct awardees. It was a great scene to see the teams (Penn State and Illinois ROTC) come up, stand in front of the platform, and award the medals and trophies to the correct teams! The crowd roared!

Then, Leigh and Rachel, who are fierce competitors and good friends, came up on the platform side by side, each with an arm around the other, turned and gave each other a big hug while the crowd applauded and cheered, and then Leigh gave Rachel her award. Both their fathers, and coach, were bursting with pride!

As a coach, I am very lucky to be able to work with athletes like the four pictured above, and so many others like them.

Get Involved

If you want to shoot rifle in college, and are not on an NCAA rifle team, you may participate on a club team, or as a solo athlete. Same for pistol. The NRA Intercollegiate Club Rifle & Pistol National Championships are two great competitions! And there are plenty of competitions during the regular season. For example, Leigh (as a solo athlete) and Rachel (as a member of the Clemson club team) have participated in the southeastern collegiate rifle conference the past two seasons. Please contact me directly (using the “Contact” menu item of the blog) if you wish to learn more and get involved.

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Feel free to “share” this and any posting on this blog.

Your comments and responses are always welcome.

Be sure to check this blog’s menu to find more information about the blog, its author, and additional resources.

To be notified of new posts, go to the “Home” page and select the small blue “Follow…” link on the right side of the page just above the search box. On mobile devices, scroll way down near the bottom to find the “Follow…” link.

Feel Center!

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Results – Georgia – State Junior Olympics – Rifle & Pistol

2014 State Shooting Pin

Georgia statewide results are now (Tue 27 Jan 2015) available for download.

2015 USA Shooting Junior Olympics Georgia State Championship Final Results

Congratulations to all the participants. It looks like there will be a large group of Georgia athletes invited to the national Junior Olympics! Individual award medals provided by USA Shooting will be distributed soon.

Endowment Awards For Teams

New this year, I worked with the Georgia Youth Shooting Sports Foundation and they have generously arranged for team endowment awards and optional round up matching awards. We are most appreciative of the GYSSF support of youth target shooting programs in Georgia.

– Medalist Awards For Teams

The GYSSF will donate and deposit awards totaling $13,500 to MidwayUSA Foundation accounts for benefit of teams as designated by each of the individual medalists in six of the JO events.

Events earning awards are women’s air rifle, smallbore rifle, and air pistol, along with men’s air rifle, smallbore rifle, and air pistol. No awards are available for women’s and men’s sport pistol this year. Awards for those two events may be added in future years if state‐wide participation grows sufficiently.

Award amounts for each of the six events are: gold $1,000, silver $750, and bronze $500.

I will be contacting each medalist with additional information.

– Round Up Matching Opportunities

Each team designated by the medalists will also have the opportunity to earn additional matching funds from GYSSF, if they so choose. These are one‐to‐one matching funds, which could total $22,500, that will be available to teams that chose to raise additional funds prior to September 15, 2015. The minimum amount that must be raised to qualify for this program is $1,000. Maximum amount for matching is: gold $1,000, silver $1,250, and bronze $1,500.

Note that GYSSF may have additional matching opportunities not related to the JO. Teams may participate in both. This JO matching is guaranteed to be available, while other opportunities depend on funds availability.

I will be contacting each designated team’s coach with additional information.

Thank You!

Thank you to all the athletes, coaches, parents, and match staff for participating in the state Junior Olympics program this year.  Have a great year!

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